Header image

What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Discuss vintage Kenner and Palitoy Star Wars toys from the 1977-1985 era.
Dannywhiteley
Jedi Knight
Jedi Knight
Posts: 557
Joined: Wed May 06, 2015 8:50 pm

Re: What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Postby Dannywhiteley » Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:52 pm

Market price is set by the mods on echobase. If it's too cheap they tell you but if it's too expensive they just wait for someone to cough up and get mugged.

User avatar
edd_jedi
Admin
Admin
Posts: 6646
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 12:43 am
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Postby edd_jedi » Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:55 pm

Only things that sell very regularly have market values, eg loose figures or common MOCs. For rarer pieces with no recent price history, the sky is the limit depending on who wants it.

Wreck-It Ralph
Jedi Trainee
Jedi Trainee
Posts: 480
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:53 pm

Re: What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Postby Wreck-It Ralph » Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:17 am

jared007 wrote:All good advice here. For items that have very little sales history (or few recent sales) you really just have to start the price high and lower until someone wants it. If doing an auction, this is a great time to set a reserve price that you are comfortable selling it at - any higher then that's a bonus. I guess the problem here is finding the kind of person that really wants it in the timeframe you advertise. You may sell low only to findout another collector would have paid even more but they just didn't hear about it in time. For high end items, your market shrinks dramatically.

Is this a hyperthetical or is this advice for you? If you give some specifics some people here might be able to help out.


It is advice for me but more about buying than selling. I occasionally get offered some rare MOC and was curious how other collectors decide what is an acceptable price to pay. I use Star Wars Tracker but unfortunately it does not pick up the private sales which seems to be the preferred method of selling for rare Palitoy MOC (at least that is what I have experienced). So do you just pay what the seller wants if it is being sold privately?

Also how do I find out how rare something is, how many known examples exist both graded and ungraded as surely this has a bearing on the price?
Because he's holding a thermal detonator!!

We all have our time machines. Some take us back, they're called memories. Some take us forward, they're called dreams.

User avatar
Michael Sith
Grand Master
Grand Master
Posts: 6973
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 3:15 pm
Location: Up North

Re: What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Postby Michael Sith » Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:29 am

Wreck-It Ralph wrote:
jared007 wrote:All good advice here. For items that have very little sales history (or few recent sales) you really just have to start the price high and lower until someone wants it. If doing an auction, this is a great time to set a reserve price that you are comfortable selling it at - any higher then that's a bonus. I guess the problem here is finding the kind of person that really wants it in the timeframe you advertise. You may sell low only to findout another collector would have paid even more but they just didn't hear about it in time. For high end items, your market shrinks dramatically.

Is this a hyperthetical or is this advice for you? If you give some specifics some people here might be able to help out.


It is advice for me but more about buying than selling. I occasionally get offered some rare MOC and was curious how other collectors decide what is an acceptable price to pay. I use Star Wars Tracker but unfortunately it does not pick up the private sales which seems to be the preferred method of selling for rare Palitoy MOC (at least that is what I have experienced). So do you just pay what the seller wants if it is being sold privately?

Also how do I find out how rare something is, how many known examples exist both graded and ungraded as surely this has a bearing on the price?


I think the point here is the rare high ticket items maybe looked at as an investment for a potential buyer, but the demand for said piece is distilled into a a pool of would be buyers, that have the collecting bug, with all of its emotive elements ( that are not there with the investor buying the piece to sell ata a profit) therefore it's is much harder to price. If a potential buyer needs said piece for his personal "run" then he is more likely to pay a higher price for it but won't get into a frenzied eBay or auction type freeforall!
A little bit like an antiques collector having great contacts in the antique dealer market who buy specifically for a client they know and know their needs and wants, thus meaning the original investor needs to be for want of a better word an "expert" on the particular area of collecting. As we all know the experts are the collectors themselves who buy to keep not as an investment ( other than maybe an investment at one point they bequeath as they won't sell anything that they have in their " Kung fu grip"!)

Just my opinion on the buying to sell as an investment.
"What is thy bidding, my master?"

User avatar
jared007
Regular
Regular
Posts: 213
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:19 pm

Re: What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Postby jared007 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:57 am

Wreck-It Ralph wrote:Also how do I find out how rare something is, how many known examples exist both graded and ungraded as surely this has a bearing on the price?


I use Star Wars Tracker to get an approximation of these questions. It's not foolproof but can help gauge things. On the desktop version you can sort price guide results by how many samples seen. So for the Gammy, you can instantly see for example that a 65D is not seen nearly as often as a 65B. But the price does not reflect that one way or another.

rareToCommon.png
rareToCommon.png (276.16 KiB) Viewed 80 times


Doing this over various time spans - especially with a start date of 2013 when I started collecting data, and including all graded/ungraded will quickly give you a view on the situation. Note, there is no POTF 92 back in these results for the criteria selected - so that should also tell you it's particularly rare if you do come across one.

criteria.png
criteria.png (78.81 KiB) Viewed 80 times
Digital vintage price guide and portfolio system: http://www.starwarstracker.com

Wreck-It Ralph
Jedi Trainee
Jedi Trainee
Posts: 480
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:53 pm

Re: What is the Market Price and Who Decides it?

Postby Wreck-It Ralph » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:10 am

Michael Sith wrote:
Wreck-It Ralph wrote:
jared007 wrote:All good advice here. For items that have very little sales history (or few recent sales) you really just have to start the price high and lower until someone wants it. If doing an auction, this is a great time to set a reserve price that you are comfortable selling it at - any higher then that's a bonus. I guess the problem here is finding the kind of person that really wants it in the timeframe you advertise. You may sell low only to findout another collector would have paid even more but they just didn't hear about it in time. For high end items, your market shrinks dramatically.

Is this a hyperthetical or is this advice for you? If you give some specifics some people here might be able to help out.


It is advice for me but more about buying than selling. I occasionally get offered some rare MOC and was curious how other collectors decide what is an acceptable price to pay. I use Star Wars Tracker but unfortunately it does not pick up the private sales which seems to be the preferred method of selling for rare Palitoy MOC (at least that is what I have experienced). So do you just pay what the seller wants if it is being sold privately?

Also how do I find out how rare something is, how many known examples exist both graded and ungraded as surely this has a bearing on the price?


I think the point here is the rare high ticket items maybe looked at as an investment for a potential buyer, but the demand for said piece is distilled into a a pool of would be buyers, that have the collecting bug, with all of its emotive elements ( that are not there with the investor buying the piece to sell ata a profit) therefore it's is much harder to price. If a potential buyer needs said piece for his personal "run" then he is more likely to pay a higher price for it but won't get into a frenzied eBay or auction type freeforall!
A little bit like an antiques collector having great contacts in the antique dealer market who buy specifically for a client they know and know their needs and wants, thus meaning the original investor needs to be for want of a better word an "expert" on the particular area of collecting. As we all know the experts are the collectors themselves who buy to keep not as an investment ( other than maybe an investment at one point they bequeath as they won't sell anything that they have in their " Kung fu grip"!)

Just my opinion on the buying to sell as an investment.


I am not looking to sell the items I buy, I just want to know that If I ever needed to sell them for whatever reason I did not overpay in the first place as whether you are a collector, Investor or something in between no one wants to buy something that they could not resell at the same price.
Because he's holding a thermal detonator!!

We all have our time machines. Some take us back, they're called memories. Some take us forward, they're called dreams.


Return to “Vintage Collecting Chat”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests